To view this page ensure that Adobe Flash Player version 11.1.0 or greater is installed.

Compass H e alt h Goal (Re)Setting Live Well Looking to achieve your personal goals in 2010 and improve your self-confidence and relationships with others? Is your child having difficulty communicating, walking or writing? Is their a lingering injury that you would like to alleviate? Do you want to improve your body’s strength and flexibility? Help is available right on the Key thanks to the diverse services of Key Therapy’s professional team. For a consultation, call 305.361.1166 or visit Spin Cycle Set your fitness routine in motion with spinning, the fun, low-impact workout that crams the benefits of cardiovascular activity and weight training into one calorie-scorching session (500+ per class!). Usually held in a group setting (hello, motivation!), you’re still able to work at your own intensity. The beginning of the year is always an important time to set new goals. “New Year’s Resolutions” often start with great excitement. Soon enough, however, we revert to old habits and patterns. Setting goals implies change. Change, especially if it contradicts the grain of your personality style, is often difficult. So how do we effectively set goals so that change lasts? There are three key ingredients in setting goals: specificity, desirability and difficulty. First, ensure your overall goal is specific and measurable: Say, “I will exercise and eat better this year,” rather than, “I will have better health this year.” How many times will you exercise weekly? How long will you meditate for daily? It’s important to have a way of objectively measuring your progress. Your long-term goal (e.g. 9 months) should also have short-term, proximal goals that serve as benchmarks of your progress. These benchmarks are not only tangible signs of your progress, but also serve as an opportunity to slow down and accept and recognize your progress. Remember, change cannot exist without a healthy balance of stability and acceptance. Secondly, make sure you actually want this goal. Research shows we are more likely to reach our goals when we are intrinsically motivated. Ask yourself if you’re doing this for yourself, or if you’re trying to satisfy somebody else’s expectations. Finally, it’s important that your goal is difficult enough but that it’s not going to over-challenge your current abilities or under-challenge and bore you. You want to be stimulated enough to encourage flow and progress. › Bradley Kerschensteiner, LMFT, received his Master of Arts in Integral Counseling Psychology from the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. Currently at Canyon Ranch Miami Beach, he integrates a variety of therapeutic approaches and is currently certified in Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR). For more information, visit Liquid Diet “Our bodies are our gardens; Our wills are our gardeners.” — William Shakespeare 30 Roll Patrol 15 lbs. Replacing just one meal a day with a healthy shake or smoothie can cut out an extra 1-2 unnecessary servings of solid foods that can pack on the pounds. Just make sure to use fruits that are naturally low in sugar. If you have a couple of extra inches around your midsection, suck it up and get ready to stand more. Whether in public or private, standing helps improve posture and keeps you looking your slimmest no matter where you are. The average American woman believes she will feel better about her body if she loses 15 pounds. Unfortunately, many of these ladies starve themselves instead of toning up with exercise. Experts agree: Toss the scale and sweat more!